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Department of Family & Community Medicine

Welcome to DFCM

The University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine (DFCM) is the largest academic department of family and community medicine in the world.

Our 2,000+ faculty of teachers and researchers are recognized internationally for excellence in teachingresearch, and clinical care.

Together, we are breaking new ground in comprehensive primary care, from office-based family practice to emergency medicine, palliative care, care of the elderly, mental health, Indigenous health, and more.

Dr. Danielle Martin

Dr. Danielle Martin

Do you have questions about or suggestions for the Department of Family and Community Medicine? DFCM faculty, learners, and staff are invited to register here to book a 20-minute session with Chair, Dr. Danielle Martin.

Register for the 2024 DFCM Conference and join faculty, learners, and staff this May as we reflect on what matters most today and tomorrow in family medicine. 

Cover of 2022 DFCM strategic plan report (landscape)

2022-2027 DFCM Strategic Plan

You shared and we listened. After extensive consultation with faculty, learners and staff, clear themes and priorities have emerged to shape DFCM’s strategic plan. And now, we are ready to share it with you.

Learn more about where we will focus our efforts over the next five years in our 2022-2027 Strategic Plan.

About DFCM

DFCM is the largest academic department of family medicine in the world and home to the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Family Medicine and Primary Care. With over 2,000 faculty, 15 hospital sites, 40+ teaching practices and 1,000+ learners at all levels, DFCM is recognized internationally for excellence in teaching, research and clinical care.

DFCM News

Apr 3, 2024
With a medical journey spanning countries and areas of focus, Dr. Aisha Husain details what drew her back to provide care in her family’s home community and why family medicine residents should soak up as much experience as possible.
Mar 26, 2024
How do we hold both these things as true—that match rates are stable, and that is still not good enough? That our discipline is struggling, as are the communities we serve; and that we are lucky to do meaningful and important work even in the midst of that struggle? Do we want to lead with the good news or the bad news?
Mar 18, 2024
Researchers at U of T are developing an AI-driven chatbot for smoking cessation therapy in Canada, helping to meet the growing need for accessible therapy and potentially saving thousands of lives annually.