Braden O'Neill MD, DPhil
Assistant Professor
DFCM
Dr. Braden O'Neill
Location
North York General Hospital
Family Medicine Teaching Unit, 4 South
North York General Hospital, 4001 Leslie Street
Toronto, ON, M2K 1E1
Accepting
Graduate Students
Volunteers
Research Interests
Disadvantaged Populations, Cancer Care, Chronic Diseases, Education Research, Health Informatics, Health Policy, Health Service Delivery, Knowledge Translation, Medications, Mental Health, Multimorbidity, Screening, Social Determinants, Experimental, Observational, Electronic Medical Records, Administrative Databases, Grounded Theory, Generic Qualitative, Mixed Methods

   Current appointments:
   Assistant Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto
   Family Physician, Family Medicine Teaching Unit, North York General Hospital
   
   Education:
   MD, University of Calgary, Canada (2015)
   DPhil in Primary Health Care, University of Oxford, United Kingdom (2014)
   BSc in Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Canada (2009)

Research/Teaching

Research Synopsis

My primary research interests are around the physical health of people with serious mental illness and the use of health information technology for patient engagement and research conduct.

Grants

Principal investigator: Cardiovascular disease risk assessment among people with schizophrenia (College of Family Physicians of Canada, 2018-2019; $5000)

Co-investigator: SPIDER-NET, A Structured Process Informed by Data, Evidence and Research-Network: An approach to support primary care practices in optimizing the management of patients with complex needs (Canadian Institute of Health Research, 2018-2022; $1 000 000)

Principal investigator: International Primary Care Research Priority Setting (North York General Hospital Foundation, 2016-2018; $7500)


 

Publications and Awards

Recent Publications

Towards an improved understanding of modern health information ecology. O’Neill B. Soc Sci Med 2017 Jan;173:108-9.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953616306645

Primary care quality indicators for children: measuring quality in UK general practice. Gill PJ, O’Neill B, Rose P, Mant D, Harnden A. Br J Gen Pract. 2014 Dec;64(629):e752-7. doi: 10.3399/bjgp14X682813.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25452539

An overview of self-administered health literacy instruments. O’Neill B, Goncalves D, Ricci-Cabello I, Ziebland S, Valderas J. PLoS One. 2014 Dec 5 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0109110
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0109110

Differences in the Volume of Pharmaceutical Advertisements between Print General Medical Journals. Gettings J, O’Neill B, Chokshi DA, Colbert JA, Gill P, Lebovic G, Lexchin J, Persaud N. PLoS One. 2014 Jan 8. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084790.
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0084790

“People power” or “pester power”? YouTube as a forum for the generation of evidence and patient advocacy. Mazanderani F, O’Neill B, Powell J. Patient Education and Counseling. 2013 Dec 3;93(3): 420-425.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0738399113002310

The role of a student-run clinic in providing primary care for Calgary’s homeless populations: a qualitative study. Campbell DJ, Gibson K, O’Neill BG, Thurston WE. BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 Jul 17;13:277. doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-13-277.
https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-13-277

Which is the best research paper of all time? O’Neill B, MacDonald H. Student BMJ 2013;21:f2662.
http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.f2662

True or False? Half of medical school teaching will soon be proved wrong. O’Neill B, MacDonald H. Student BMJ 2013;21:f2491
http://student.bmj.com/student/view-article.html?id=sbmj.f2491

‘People power’ or ‘Pester power’? YouTube, multiple sclerosis, and the ‘liberation procedure’. O’Neill B, Mazanderani F, Powell J. Lancet 2012;380:S20, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60376-1.
https://www.thelancet.com/pb/assets/raw/Lancet/pdfs/public-health/Public_Health_Abstracts_ALL_Part18.pdf

The evidence underpinning sports performance products: A systematic assessment. Heneghan C., Howick J., O’Neill B., Gill PJ., Lasserson DS., Cohen D., Davis R., Ward A., Smith A., Jones G., Thompson M. BMJ Open 2012;2(4).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22815461

Mythbusting sports and exercise products. Heneghan C., Gill P., O’Neill B., Lasserson D., Thake M., Thompson M. BMJ 2012;45:e4848.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22810389

Honours and Awards

New Investigator Award, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto (2017)

Rhodes Scholarship (2010)