Distributing essential medicines for free resulted in a 44 per cent increase in adherence, some improved health outcomes: study

Oct 8, 2019
Author: 
Jennifer Stranges

A new study out of St. Michael’s Hospital’s MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions found that distributing essential medicines at no charge to patients resulted in a 44 per cent increase in people taking their medications.

The study, publishing on Oct. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine, also found that participants experienced a reduction in systolic blood pressure and that free distribution of essential medicines led to a 160 per cent increase in the likelihood of participants being able to make ends meet.

The list of 128 essential medicines made available in the study was adapted from the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines and based on Canadian clinical practice guidelines, suggestions from clinicians and patients, prescribing volumes and evidence syntheses. The medicines in the study included treatments for acute conditions, such as antibiotics and pain relievers, as well as chronic conditions, such as antipsychotics and HIV-AIDS medications.

Continue reading on St. Michael's Hospital's website.